Category Archives: Paris

Promenade Gourmandes – Paris Cooking Class – Dessert

 

Today is all about dessert. Apple tart with decadent butter crust and almond topping. mmmmmmmmmmm!

This was the menu for our cooking class:

Cheese plate with a lovely bottle of Valdé Loire Souvingnon Tauraine

Petits Souffles de Christophie

Veal Paupiettes aux Herbes filled with spinach and mushroom

Saute of potato and celeriac

White Asparagus

Tarte aux Pommes Nougatine

Red wine (again from Valdé Loire, but I forgot to snap a picture of it – it was delicious though) and baguett

This crust was very easy to make. Just butter, oil, flour and a pinch of salt. We peeled and diced fresh apples, then cooked them in butter. Before cooking the apples, we made a topping of slivered almonds, egg whites and sugar.

The cooked apples were then flambe’d with brandy and placed in the baked crust. Then we topped the apples with the almond mixture and baked it all to delicious golden perfection.

 

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Promenades Gourmandes – Paris Cooking School – Main Course (and Veggies)

 

Today’s post is about the main course and veggies. This was our menu:

Cheese plate with a lovely bottle of Valdé Loire Souvingnon Tauraine

Petits Souffles de Christophie

Veal Paupiettes aux Herbes filled with spinach and mushroom

Saute of potato and celeriac

White Asparagus

Tarte aux Pommes Nougatine

Red wine (again from Valdé Loire, but I forgot to snap a picture of it – it was delicious though) and baguette

 

Now we get to the main course – a veal scaloppine stuffed with a spinach and mushroom duxelle along with the side vegetables of white asparagus and a saute of potatoes and celeriac.
Earlier in the morning when shopping, un boucher prepared veal scaloppine for us, so there was no need to pound it into thin submission, just unwrap, stuff and tie. I enjoyed going to each shop in the market, meeting the proprietor and leaving with gorgeous food , fresh and precisely presented.
White asparagus is preferredin France. After tasting these, I would have to agree. The secret is to get the largest stalks, then peel them carefully and steam them to delicious perfection (with a bit of clarified butter and lemon).
The celeriac was something new for me. I found it interesting that it should be combined with another root vegetable – in our case potaotes. I think that it would also be delicious roasted with carrots, turnips and beets.
After cooking down the mushrooms in luscious butter, finely diced shallots were added and then the spinach. This was cooked just to make the spinach tender. The duxelle was cooled and then we spooned some onto the veal scaloppine, rolled and tied them. These were then browned in a pan with oil. When fully cooked, the rolls were removed from the pan and the pan deglazed with white wine followed by a swirl of dijon mustard , cream, and butter – yum!
Now we sliced the rolls, sauced them, plated the veggies (in my case I got to use these cute little molds for my veggies), poured some wine and savored every delectable morsel. Bon Appétit.
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Promenades Gourmandes – Paris Cooking Class – The Cheese Souffle

 

Twice Baked Cheese Souffle

Now that the introductions were done, we all got down to the business of preparing our afternoon meal.

This was our menu:

Cheese plate with a lovely bottle of Valdé Loire Souvingnon Tauraine

Petits Souffles de Christophie

Veal Paupiettes aux Herbes filled with spinach and mushroom

Saute of potato and celeriac

White Asparagus

Tarte aux Pommes Nougatine

Red wine (again from Valdé Loire, but I forgot to snap a picture of it – it was delicious though) and baguette

First up – the souffles. These were not the traditional French souffle that rises and puffs in a hot oven. This one is baked twice and had a more dense and creamy texture. I’ve been experimenting with the traditional French souffle so look for a post soon – but first I have to work on my technique a bit. Instead of rising uniformly, the first one looked like an upside down mushroom. It’s a shame that I’ll have to eat so many practice specimens. But I digress. The souffles we made can be made a day ahead and popped back in the oven at serving time. They were very delicious and a good way to make a first course for a dinner party. The primary difference between these and a traditional souffle was in the cooking method. For a traditional souffle, the dish is cooked dry in a hot oven so that it puffs and rises. The souffles we made were cooked in a hot water bath similar to the method for custards or flan. This is what gave the souffles their dense and creamy texture. Everything else was pretty much the same.

First smear softened butter to coat the souffle molds. Separate the egg yolks from the whites. Make a béchamel sauce and incorporate the egg yolks and cheese. Beat the egg whites until stiff and fold into the béchamel/egg/cheese mixture, then bake. Once they are baked, remove from the oven to cool and then un-mold. Place the un-molded souffles  in a baking dish, pour over a very light cream sauce and place them back in the oven to warm and rise a little. Serve with chopped chives, parsley or other fresh herb you have on hand. Bon Appétit.

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Promenades Gourmandes – Paris Cooking Class

With the market portion of our Promenades Gourmandes experience complete, we took the metro back to Paule Caillat’s stunning Paris apartment to begin the cooking portion of our class. There were six of us in the class and we enjoyed every minute – especially the tasting. The first part of the class was to get acquainted, set the ground rules and put on our aprons. I fell in love with her fabulous red stove and wanted to take it home with me.

 

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Much more to share in the next post.

Paris Market Street – rue de Petits Carreauex

While in Paris, I decided at the last minute to see if I could get into a cooking class. What I really wanted was some instruction in Paris market shopping. A quick internet search turned up Madame Paule and her Promenades Gourmandes class. We met at rue de Petits Carreauex for the first part of the class for a native’s perspective on Paris market shopping. I had heard much hype about rue Cler as a wonderful market street and had visited there the day before. I have to say that it was such a disappointment. Especially after my morning at the Versailles open air market earlier in the week. Rue de Petits Carreauex, however was just as I envisioned a Paris market street. We began at the fish monger, made our way to the butcher, the produce market, the cheese experts, and finally the bakery. Normally the last stop is the wine shop, but Madame Paule already had a selection of wines prepared for our class and meal.

I’ll post about the Versailles market and my class later. For now here is the market street rue de Petits Carreauex.

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Macaroons – A Paris Classic

 

No trip to Paris would be complete without a visit to Laduree for macaroons.